Random Acts of Architecture

Tales of an architect trying to bring order to the chaos that is modern information technology.

An Architect’s Place in Agile

Scrum, the most common implementation of the Agile development methodology, has many well-defined roles. Those that contribute directly to the sprint (a unit of work usually lasting 2-4 weeks) are called “pigs”. Those that consult or assist only are “chickens”, the “scrum master” coordinates the sprint and the “product owner” prioritizes work and ensures the customer needs are met.

So where does the software architect fit in? The architect is not a pig if he or she does not write production code. Is he or she a chicken? The architect needs to be driving his or her features in the sprint and be more involved than a chicken. The architect is not responsible for team organization and a customer representative is usually the product owner.

Going back to basics, why is a software architect needed? Architects are rarely needed in projects with small, co-located teams full of senior developers working on well-defined requirements or well-understood problems. They can usually design and cooperate well enough to produce the desired results. However, large, distributed teams full of junior developers working on vague requirements or complex problems need coordination and direction. This is where architects are most useful.

One way of looking at it is Scrum is a software development methodology, not a productization methodology. Software development is one part of producing a product but there are many other parts, particularly for commercially sold software, such as business case design, marketing, licensing, documentation and localization. The architect could deliver non-functional requirements and high-level designs outside sprints like the other non-development tasks.

However, the architect need not deliver a monolithic document for the high-level design. In keeping with the Agile manifesto, as well as the Lean principle of making decisions as late as possible, the architect only needs to produce enough of the design to unblock the next sprint. The architect will still need a high-level design and identify non-functional requirements initially but Agile recognizes that design is as much a process as a product. Designs for subsequent sprints can be fleshed out in parallel with the development team, minimizing design rework as the team learns more about the problem and finds better solutions.

Could a software architect use Scrum to create the high-level design, either separate to or in parallel with the development teams? This can work if the architect has easy access to the resources he or she needs, such as customers to help understand the business problems, architects from other teams to discuss integration and development managers to check resource estimates. This cannot be guaranteed, particularly with larger, distributed groups – the cases where architects are most useful. However, it will occur in practice if the architect is providing designs for the start of each sprint.

Indeed, if the product owner is remote or often unavailable, an architect fits best into Scrum as a stand-in product owner. This breaks the Scrum rules of only having one product owner. However, different time zones, large projects and multiple commitments mean a single person cannot scale, as a former colleague of mine explained.

Development management may baulk at the perceived loss of control by making an architect a product owner. However, the word “owner” in “product owner” does not mean control of the product, merely creating, prioritizing and clarifying tasks, which architects often do anyway. Architects may not be customers but are judged whether the product meets the requirements or creates business value, just like product owners. They also know the product strategy and have spent time with the customer understanding the problem so are well-suited for this role, using their judgment to determine whether to escalate each question to the product owner.

Moreover, I think the question is not “Where does the architect fit into Agile?”, it’s “How can architects leverage Agile to better perform their role?”. For example, the architect can gain more visibility into the development team’s progress and status (through the backlog and burn down charts). The architect can present the design and gain consensus at the planning meeting that starts a sprint and (hopefully) see it working in the hand-over meeting at the end of a sprint.

Most importantly, architects must be in control of their performance rather than victims of process. A lot of smart people have worked very hard on Agile and Scrum and developers new to Scrum are advised to follow it as written, at least initially, because the reasons behind its nuances are often unclear. However, no development methodology can handle every case, and software architects are one of those things that can fall into the gaps.

3 responses to “An Architect’s Place in Agile

  1. Pingback: Is Agile architect an oxymoron? « Yet another software guy's blog

  2. RockyJ August 22, 2012 at 4:51 pm

    A very well written post, it echoes my own thoughts on this topic.

  3. Pingback: The Tao of the Software Architect « Rubber Tyres –> Smooth Rides

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