Random Acts of Architecture

Tales of an architect trying to bring order to the chaos that is modern information technology.

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Talking Non-Tech

IT architects often pride themselves on their technical knowledge. Tasked with designing a system from end-to-end and taking responsibility for that design, they need to ensure the details are right. They also need to demonstrate technical prowess to earn respect from technical developers and engineers.

However, as discussed in previous posts, architects also have to talk to non-technical people to gather requirements, understand the business context and assure them that a design will meet their needs. For people used to delving into the technical details, this context and mindset switch can be challenging.

First, understand the value the architect’s proposed changes bring to stakeholders and organization. Understand not just what each stakeholder has asked for but how that stakeholder’s performance is measured and describe the impact of proposals in those terms.

Taking an operations manager as an example, describe how this will reduce incident frequency or severity. For a salesperson, relate this to imminent or key deals. For any management, ensure they understand how the changes relate to KPIs, long-term objectives or organizational policies.

A quick way to do this is to describe a technical change then ask “So what?”. Relate it to each stakeholder in a sentence or two then invite questions. Take note of anything asked and ensure it is covered next time.

Sometimes non-technical people suggest technical solutions. While most IT architect’s immediate reaction is to dismiss these as ill-informed, a better response is to understand the reasons behind it. Did this suggestion work last time? Is the relative cost for the asker small? Is a suggested tool the only one the asker is familiar with?

A better response from an architect is to evaluate suggestions and provide quicker, cheaper and/or better alternatives. Sometimes, however, it is important to buy-in by using elements of their suggestion, even if it is technically suboptimal.

Unless the organization has prescribed formulas or a culture of doing so, avoid trying to express impacts in financial terms. Chances are architects will get it wrong. Be careful using jargon or discipline-specific terms, too. Technical people cringe when non-technical people misuse technical terms. It happens the other way around, too.

Describe the context of a technical change in both technical and business terms. What existing systems or processes are impacted? What can we do now that we could not before? What can we do better or cheaper? What additional work is required or what work is saved?

No system exists in a vacuum and there are always flow-on effects for every change. If an architect cannot articulate these, chances are the requirements were not fully understood or analysis was lacking.

Describe the impact constraints have on the design or team implementing the design. Do not just list them (“We only have three engineers”). Say how this impacts the solution (“Option A is a better solution but, because we have a small team and a tight deadline, we are going for option B”).

Everyone in the organization has to deal with constraints. Sharing them helps build trust across teams. It also invites stakeholders, who sometimes have more experience, to suggest better ways of dealing with them.

Produce and use good quality communication. Consider using multiple views of a solution for different audiences, emphasizing different aspects. Use aesthetically pleasing diagrams with consistent use of symbols and colour. Do not be afraid of detail – it gives the audience the impression you have a deep understanding of the problem and solution – but ensure the communication is broad, covering the value and context as outlined above, instead of deep. Provide overviews or summaries to help time challenged people understand important points.

Communication should also cover solutions that were not selected or implemented. The implemented design or change will be evident. Understanding what alternatives were considered is often forgotten, particularly for trade-offs or others’ suggestions.

Beyond communicating better with non-technical people, these practices help architects understand the impact of technical changes on the organization beyond the immediate. It raises questions about larger impacts and exposes gaps in the architects understanding. It also helps build relationships.

Ultimately, being able to communicate effectively with non-technical people makes the architect a better architect. IT architects are more than just designers. They are collaborators and evangelists and they cannot do this if they can only talk and think like engineers. Architects are often the face of the team, department or company and the impression the architect needs to make a good impression.

Moreover, an architect’s technical solution exists within the organization’s social and political environments, not just technical. The architect is responsible for their work’s political and organizational success, too.

Image Credit: http://www.thebluediamondgallery.com/wooden-tile/v/value.html under Creative Commons 3 License (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Should Software Architects Write Code?

Much has been written and debated on whether software architects should write code. Many argue the more architects understand the language, tools and environment they are designing for, the more effective they are and this is best achieved by implementing some or all of the design. Non-coding architects, sometimes called “PowerPoint architects”, “astronaut architects” or “ivory tower architects”, may use archibabble and talkitecture to convince non-technical stakeholders of their expertise while delegating the unsolved, real problems to developers, so much so that it has become an organizational pattern (“Architect Also Implements“) and corresponding anti-pattern (“Architects Don’t Code“). Others argue that architects responsible for implementing their architectures lose focus on the bigger issues and longer term vision. Understanding does not necessarily require knowledge of the minutiae and, as systems scale up and diversify, implementing it requires too much time or spreads the architect too thin. Therefore, should software architects write code?

As with many difficult questions, the problem starts with the question itself. “Should a software architect write code?” can mean “Should a software architect always prototype or implement their own architectures?”, “Should a software architect write production code most of the time?” or “Should a software architect be able to write code?”. It could also mean “Is coding the best or only way to become a software architect?” or “Can non-coders be good architects?” but that is best left to another blog post.

It also depends on the definition of “software architect”. The Canadian architect (of buildings rather than IT) Witold Rybczynski wrote in his 1989 book “The Most Beautiful House in the World“:

“For centuries, the difference between master masons, journeymen builders, joiners, dilettantes, gifted amateurs, and architects has been ill defined. The great Renaissance buildings, for example, were designed by a variety of non-architects. Brunelleschi was trained as a goldsmith; Michelango as a sculptor, Leonardo da Vinci as a painter, and Alberti as a lawyer; only Bramante, who was also a painter, had formally studied building. These men are termed architects because, among other things, they created architecture — a tautology that explains nothing.”

This is exactly the same issue for software architects. Without a clearly defined and segregated role, anyone designing software or IT related systems can rightly be called an architect, including many developers and technical leads. For the sake of argument, this post uses Simon Brown’s definition, where software architects are responsible for high level design, non-functional requirements and technical vision.

Should a software architect should be able to write code? Architects should be able to read and write code because it:

  1. Verifies the code written by developers matches the design and identifies deviations.
  2. Helps the architect learn about changes or new features. If the architect has been assigned to a new project, he or she can learn the product sooner by looking at the code, too.
  3. Allows the architect to write a proof of concepts or prototype. A working demo is much more convincing than an architecture diagram and will usually facilitate better estimates. Care must be taken to prevent non-technical stakeholders attaching too much credibility to it, as with any prototype however.
  4. Provides another pair of capable hands during the project crunch periods.
  5. Makes the architect more forgiving of bugs because the architect has likely made similar mistakes in the past. At least, the architect should have a better understanding what types of issues to expect.

Writing code may help earn the architect respect of the developers. Developers can be notoriously dismissive and a software architect producing some of his or her own code, even if it is just a proof of concept, or providing good feedback from a code review can make the developers feel like the architect is one of them. Having a working development environment and access to source code means the architect can try out new versions without waiting for a build or release. Any significant build, development environment or source code control issues also become apparent to the architect.

Note that code reviews do not replace talking to developers because regular discussions between developers and software architects can help build mutual respect. Otherwise, developers may see the architect as a constraint or threat that must be circumvented. Also, developers often know or can find problem areas faster than the architect reading the code but there needs to be a balance between architect self-sufficiency and squandering developer time.

Software architects are often required to settle disputes between developers, such as when one team discovers a better way of solving a problem or that the proposed design will be harder to implement than first thought. Software architects are also sometimes mentors or coaches for developers or may be used as internal consultants to examine process, quality, automation or similar issues. Understanding code means the architect can use his or her judgment more effectively rather than rely on which developer is more persuasive.

Should a software architect write production code most of the time (usually implementing their own architecture)? If a software architect implements their own architectures, this ensures the design is implementable with the tools and environment used. This can lead to new insights, improved designs and more accurate estimations. It is also implemented by the person most familiar with the design so minimizes miscommunication.

However, architects may jump to implementation (depth thinking) before exhausting other solutions (breadth thinking). Existing implementations may overly influence the architect or the architect become attached to his or her code, fighting against needed improvements. It can distract the architect from higher level tasks such as longer term planning, communicating with stakeholders and reviewing other developers’ code.

Also, part of the role of an architect is to fight for reuse, security and other non-functional requirements. Being forced to prototype or implement their design may encourage compromises that the team need not make. It is not that an architect does not make compromises – design is the art of compromise as many have said – more that it is the architect’s job to make the right compromises rather than those the architect makes creating the initial implementation. The developers will likely rewrite much of the architect’s code, anyway.

Indeed, the more an architect focuses on communication, requirements analysis, stakeholder management and non-technical activities, the more the development skills of software architects may atrophy. As long as the architect is providing value via other means this is not an issue. However, an architect should maintain his or her development skills; whether by extensive research, working on their own projects or contributing where they can; but needs to focus on capabilities, limitations and edge cases rather than speed or a complete understanding.

Problems may occur when organizations promote their strongest developers into a software architect role rather than good communicators that are capable of working at higher levels of abstraction. Friction arises when these architects try to “lead from the front” by implementing their architecture rather than facilitating others to do so. Organizations should promote a developer that has better soft skills, instead.

Many confuse not writing code with a lack of feedback. An unprototyped architecture, hypothetically, may be difficult to implement or problematic. However, a senior developer or technical lead can prototype the architecture if required. This also allows architects and developers to work together and ensure the design is communicated well. Alternatively, the architecture can be shared with others that have implemented similar systems previously or architects or developers working on integrating products. Requiring an architect to implement their own architecture beyond a proof of concept also does not scale well, particularly for large or complex products.

Similarly, many confuse an architect not writing code with a lack of accountability. Architects must produce designs that not only are approved (whether formally or informally) by stakeholders but also developers and developers should not approve a document that does not meet their needs. Issues or errors in the designs should be noted. Some change is expected but major or expensive errors should be attributed to the architect. An architect implementing their architecture in code does not guarantee an issue-free project.

With increased use of agile development methodologies, architects are no longer creating an architecture and “throwing it over the wall” to developers. Even previously ivory tower architects are more involved with lower level issues since less critical decisions are deferred until later in the process and design is iterative. For example, architects in organizations using Scrum should attend at least the planning, review and retrospective meetings. (Some architects may move to other projects or otherwise not see the project through, the “Architects Play Golf” pattern. This is an organizational issue and unrelated to whether architects code.)

Many developers also look down on “PowerPoint architectures”. However, many forget the role of a software architect is as much communication as development and completed, implemented architecture does not help non-technical stakeholders, QA, localization, documentation writers and so on. Of course, these stratospheric PowerPoint architectures are not substitutes for high-level designs developers can implement but the architect represents the developers and products to outsiders and developers often feel any time not spent developing is unproductive. Ultimately, PowerPoint architectures do have their place but developers are as much the architects’ customers as the stakeholders.

Should architects write code? The question is loaded and should be determined by the team on a case by case basis. Architects may prototype high risk projects, experiment with new libraries or try out now tools. Architects may completely delegate the design and implementation of well understood, low risk components. The real question is “How does an architect be successful?”. It is a question of managing and mitigating risk. Architects are often good coders but good coders are not necessarily good architects.

Update: There is a large discussion about this post on the IASA (International Association of Software Architects) LinkedIn group: http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Should-Software-Architects-Code-1523.S.188454845

An Architect’s Place in Agile

Scrum, the most common implementation of the Agile development methodology, has many well-defined roles. Those that contribute directly to the sprint (a unit of work usually lasting 2-4 weeks) are called “pigs”. Those that consult or assist only are “chickens”, the “scrum master” coordinates the sprint and the “product owner” prioritizes work and ensures the customer needs are met.

So where does the software architect fit in? The architect is not a pig if he or she does not write production code. Is he or she a chicken? The architect needs to be driving his or her features in the sprint and be more involved than a chicken. The architect is not responsible for team organization and a customer representative is usually the product owner.

Going back to basics, why is a software architect needed? Architects are rarely needed in projects with small, co-located teams full of senior developers working on well-defined requirements or well-understood problems. They can usually design and cooperate well enough to produce the desired results. However, large, distributed teams full of junior developers working on vague requirements or complex problems need coordination and direction. This is where architects are most useful.

One way of looking at it is Scrum is a software development methodology, not a productization methodology. Software development is one part of producing a product but there are many other parts, particularly for commercially sold software, such as business case design, marketing, licensing, documentation and localization. The architect could deliver non-functional requirements and high-level designs outside sprints like the other non-development tasks.

However, the architect need not deliver a monolithic document for the high-level design. In keeping with the Agile manifesto, as well as the Lean principle of making decisions as late as possible, the architect only needs to produce enough of the design to unblock the next sprint. The architect will still need a high-level design and identify non-functional requirements initially but Agile recognizes that design is as much a process as a product. Designs for subsequent sprints can be fleshed out in parallel with the development team, minimizing design rework as the team learns more about the problem and finds better solutions.

Could a software architect use Scrum to create the high-level design, either separate to or in parallel with the development teams? This can work if the architect has easy access to the resources he or she needs, such as customers to help understand the business problems, architects from other teams to discuss integration and development managers to check resource estimates. This cannot be guaranteed, particularly with larger, distributed groups – the cases where architects are most useful. However, it will occur in practice if the architect is providing designs for the start of each sprint.

Indeed, if the product owner is remote or often unavailable, an architect fits best into Scrum as a stand-in product owner. This breaks the Scrum rules of only having one product owner. However, different time zones, large projects and multiple commitments mean a single person cannot scale, as a former colleague of mine explained.

Development management may baulk at the perceived loss of control by making an architect a product owner. However, the word “owner” in “product owner” does not mean control of the product, merely creating, prioritizing and clarifying tasks, which architects often do anyway. Architects may not be customers but are judged whether the product meets the requirements or creates business value, just like product owners. They also know the product strategy and have spent time with the customer understanding the problem so are well-suited for this role, using their judgment to determine whether to escalate each question to the product owner.

Moreover, I think the question is not “Where does the architect fit into Agile?”, it’s “How can architects leverage Agile to better perform their role?”. For example, the architect can gain more visibility into the development team’s progress and status (through the backlog and burn down charts). The architect can present the design and gain consensus at the planning meeting that starts a sprint and (hopefully) see it working in the hand-over meeting at the end of a sprint.

Most importantly, architects must be in control of their performance rather than victims of process. A lot of smart people have worked very hard on Agile and Scrum and developers new to Scrum are advised to follow it as written, at least initially, because the reasons behind its nuances are often unclear. However, no development methodology can handle every case, and software architects are one of those things that can fall into the gaps.

The Other Side of Software Architect Innovation

As stated previously in this blog, software architects must be innovators. They are responsible for creating a technical vision to apply new technologies to further the customers’ goals and/or reduce development costs and for high level designs. Many books, lectures, blogs and so on describe the process of innovation and are not repeated here but, when confronted with a problem, most developers and architects either work out their own solution or lazily Google something similar. However, software developers and architects, in particular, need not “reinvent the wheel”.
 
Ignoring structured learning, such as degrees and certificates, there are two ways architects can learn ways others do things. The first is to proactively listen for new information.Most software architects will already read favourite blogs or web sites, follow twitter luminaries, subscribe to magazines, read textbooks, attend conventions and so on. However, the key with information sources is efficiency – five sources providing predominantly relevant information is better than one hundred poor sources.
 
Aim for a mix of information sources, including some technical, some design, some industry commentary and some aggregators (those that provide interesting links to other sources that may only occasionally have relevant information). Review sources over time because the architect’s requirements, knowledge and expectations will change over time. Experiment with new things and plan to either remove “old favorites” or check them less often when they are no longer being consistently useful.
 
The second is to research topics when the need arises. Competitor’s products are good places to start but, unless this is a major feature, information is often sparse. Internet searches or dedicated development sites are useful but iterating synonyms is time-consuming.
 
Software architects often neglect academic texts or papers, which are particularly useful if the group is using more complex algorithms. Use Google Scholar or consider joining ACM or IEEE to access their academic paper repositories. Such papers may be dry or assume too much knowledge initially but persisting may reveal better approaches, establish common terminology and point out less explored areas suitable for potential patents or the architect’s own academic papers if he or she is so inclined.
 
Some would recommend looking at open source software. Assuming the product is chosen with care, open source software or other people’s code in general is a great source of information from obscure language features to new algorithms. However, the software architect must not copy any code verbatim or infringe patents or licenses.
 
If the problem is not solved or not solved sufficiently by prior art and the organization has a process in place, software architects should create and file patents. Arguments over whether software patents encourage or discourage innovation are irrelevant. As they say, “You cannot win the game from the sideline”. The IT industry is pursuing patents aggressively and companies that do not, such as Google with Android, now face legal challenges and hurdles. For the software architects, patents are one of the few peer-reviewed, universally available measures of creativity available. Many organizations also offer financial incentives for them, too.
 
Beyond the software architect’s products and patents, avenues for innovation include open source software, apps in app stores, writing a technical blog, conferences or academic papers. Approval may be required from the organization and social networking activity will need to comply with the organization’s policy but this can help the software architect’s personal brand and help find or precipitate conversations with like-minded individuals.
 
The single most important thing about innovation is to start. A software architect must be a technical leader but cannot lead without producing and cannot produce without starting. The first attempts may be unremarkable or unsuccessful but persistence will bear fruit.

What is Technical Vision?

Few things are so error prone and political as the architects’  “technical vision”. Technical vision identifies longer term technical goals (such as add iPad support or upgrade to the new database version) and describes how to reach them, perhaps over multiple releases. Clearly, this is only useful for larger, ongoing or technically complex projects.

Many architects aim for isolated technical improvements in their first technical vision. Unshackled from the constraints of time and resources, these are often ambitious, large-scale changes intended to make anticipated subsequent changes easier by adopting new technologies, creating reusable components and standardizing formats and protocols.

The first issue with this approach is that little is tied back to customer or business requirements. Otherwise, the architect risks an “ivory tower” situation, recommending or enforcing designs often blamed for inflated resource requirements and missed deadlines.

The best way to avoid this and gain credibility is to interview stakeholders, identify changes they want made and incorporate them into the vision. Non-business stakeholders like testers, localizers and documentation writers often want product improvements, too. Perceptive architects prioritize stakeholder requests that echo their own thoughts and, once the architect has demonstrated delivering these in products, architects will gain the credibility and latitude to add some of their own ideas.

The second issue is with component reuse and standardization. While the architect’s high level view is good for identifying opportunities for these and prioritizing them, links back to business requirements are difficult to articulate, particularly to non-technical stakeholders. Developers hold code written by others to a higher standard than their own (particularly documentation, quality, scalability and security), will use such components in ways never originally envisaged or intended and backwards compatibility requirements can limit improvements. However, the biggest danger with writing reusable components and standardization is the tendency to focus on them and not the problems they solve.

Writing reusable components and standardization are organizational decisions as much as architectural ones. Bugs or enhancement requests need tracking, prioritizing, fixing in a timely manner and distribution. Good approaches for reusable components include starting with small, non-critical components or creating internal “open source” projects where anyone can contribute, subject to review. Avoid forking components if possible.

Standardization requires a middle ground between forgoing features (“lowest common denominator” approach) and spending additional effort (the “kitchen ink” approach) and organizations must resist doing too much of the latter. It is best to start with often used interfaces and include security, scalability, performance, error behaviour and similar non-functional requirements.

Lastly, new technologies are often attractive, exciting and claim to solve problems more effectively, reducing development time and cost. However, adopting new technology requires an understanding of the whole system and not just isolated problems, lest it cause more problems than it solves. Once again, there is an organizational cost with retraining developers, purchasing new tools and integrating it with old technologies. New technologies are best trialled first with a proof of concept.

Good technical visions are known to and have the backing of both stakeholders and developers, which is easier if creating it involved them. Technical visions need not be detailed or specific, at least not initially and good technical visions are accessible, unambiguous and concise. If others cannot read them or understand them, it cannot be implemented or implementations will digress from the intention. As mentioned before in this blog, it is the architects’ responsibility to communicate the vision effectively.

Technical visions can change over time, too. This reflects changing business requirements, technology landscape and development techniques. It also reflects expressing the intention more effectively. Constructive criticism and discussion is vital, both to improve it and, as also mentioned before in this blog, incorporating others’ feedback gives them ownership and ensures it is current.

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