Random Acts of Architecture

Tales of an architect trying to bring order to the chaos that is modern information technology.

Tag Archives: Legal

Theresa May vs Encryption vs Solutions

Theresa MayTheresa May’s speech in response to the recent terrorist attacks in London have, once again, mentioned cracking down on cyberspace “to prevent terrorist and extremist planning” and “this ideology the safe space it needs to breed.” World leaders, including Australia’s prime minister Malcolm Turnbull supported her, saying US social media companies should assist by “providing access to encrypted communications.”

Cory Doctorow and others make valid points about how impractical and difficult these dictates are to implement. Politicians mistakenly assume that weakened encryption or backdoors would only be available to authorized law enforcement and underestimate how interdependent the global software industry is.

However, presenting this as a binary argument is a “sucker’s choice”. Law enforcement is likely concerned because it cannot access potential evidence they have a legal right to see. While same laws arguably impinge personal freedoms, is it technology’s or technologists’ role to police governments?

Meanwhile, modern cryptography protecting data cannot also allow law enforcement access without weakening it. Consequently, technologists lambast politicians as ignorant and motivated by populism, not unreasonable considering Brexit and similar recent political events.

As technologists, we know what technology can and, more relevantly, cannot do. While it defines short term options, our current technology does not limit options in the long term. The technology industry needs to use the intelligence and inventiveness it prides itself on to solve both problems.

I do not know what forms these solutions will take. However, I look to technologies like homomorphic encryption or YouTube’s automated ability to scan it’s nearly uncountable number of videos for copyright infringements. There is certainly challenge, profit and prestige to be found.

The threat of criminal or terrorist action is not new. Mobile phones, social media and other phenomena of the digital age grant them the same protections as everyone else. Dismissing solutions from the ignorant does not mean the underlying problems go away. If the technology industry does not solve them, politicians may soon do it for them and, as Cory Doctorow and others point out, this will be the real tragedy.

Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/number10gov/32793567693

InfoSec: Not just for hackers

everybody-needs-a-hackerI recently read Troy Hunt’s blog post on careers in information security. Troy makes good points about information security as a potential career and the benefits of certifications like the Certified Ethical Hacker. Hackers are getting increasingly sophisticated, requiring specific knowledge to counter, and cryptography is hard. We need more information security specialists.

However, one criticism of the post, indeed the information security industry, is its implication hacking is the sole information security career path. This binary viewpoint – you are either a security person or not and there is only one “true” information security professional – does more harm than good.

Hacking is technology focused. However, security’s scope is not just technical. Information security needs people that can articulate security issue impact, potential solutions and their cost in terms non-security people can understand. This requires expertise and credibility in multiple disciplines from individual contributor level to management to boardrooms.

Security solutions are not just technical. We live in societies governed by laws. These can be standardized government security requirements as FedRAMP or IRAP. These can be contractual obligations like PCI-DSS, covering credit card transactions. These can hold organizations accountable, like mandatory breach disclosure legislation, or protect or privacy, like the European Union’s Data Protection laws. Effective legislation requires knowledge of both law and information security and the political nous to get it enacted.

We are also surrounded by financial systems. Financial systems to punish those with weak security and reward those with good security will only evolve if we (consumers and investors) value security more. Cyber insurance has potential. Cryptographic technologies like bitcoin and block chain algorithms are threatening to disrupt the financial sectors. Information security has and will continue to impact finance.

The list goes on. Law enforcement needs to identify, store and present cybercrime evidence to juries and prosecute under new and changing laws. Hospitals and doctors want to take advantage of electronic health records..

The security technology focus drives people away non-technology people. In a world crying out for diversity and collaboration, the last thing information security needs is people focusing solely inward on their own craft, reinforcing stereotypes of shady basement dwellers, and not on systems security enables.

Bringing this back to software, many organizations contract or hire in information security experts. Unfortunately, the OWASP Top 10 changed little from 2010 to 2013 and some say is unlikely to change in the 2016 call for data. According to the Microsoft Security Intelligence Report, around half of serious, industry wide problems are from applications. Developers make the same mistakes again and again.

Education is one solution – security literate developers will avoid or fix security issues themselves. A better solution is tools and libraries that are not vulnerable in the first place, moving security from being reactive to proactive. For example, using an Object-Relational Mapping library or parameterized queries instead of string substitution for writing SQL.

Unfortunately, security people often lack skills to contribute to development and design beyond security. While information security touches many areas, information security expertise is not development (or networking or architecture or DevOps) expertise.

Information security needs different perspectives to succeed. As Corey House, a Puralsight author like Troy Hunt says in his course Becoming an Outlier, one route to career success is specialization. Information security is a specialization for everyone to consider, not just hackers.

Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/adulau/8442476626

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